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Center for Respect of Life and Environment (CRLE)
Programs & Services

ANIMALS & SOCIETY COURSES - BY STATE OR COUNTRY

AlabamaKentucky
North DakotaCanada
AlaskaLouisianaOhioSpain
ArizonaMaineOklahoma 
ArkansasMarylandOregon 
CaliforniaMassachusettsPennsylvania 
ColoradoMichiganRhode Island 
ConnecticutMinnesotaSouth Carolina 
DelawareMississippiSouth Dakota 
District of ColumbiaMissouriTennessee 
FloridaMontanaTexas 
GeorgiaNebraskaUtah 
HawaiiNevadaVermont 
IdahoNew HampshireVirginia 
IllinoisNew JerseyWashington 
IndianaNew MexicoWest Virginia 
IowaNew YorkWisconsin 
KansasNorth CarolinaWyoming 


Alabama

VETERINARY MEDICINE AND MEDICINE

Institution: Tuskegee University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Tuskegee, AL 36088
Course Title: Human-Animal Relationships Rotation
Instructor: Sue-Ellen Brown, Psy. D. and Caroline B. Schaffer, D.V.M., 334-727-8122 brownse@tuskegee.edu, schaffer@tuskegee.edu
Summary: This clinical rotation is designed to give third-year veterinary medical students the opportunity to learn communication and interpersonal skills that will enhance their professional interactions with animals and people.


Arizona

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: Arizona State University, PO Box 871802, Temple, AZ 85287-1802
Course Title: Animal-Human Connections
Instructors: Christina Risley-Curtiss, MSSW, Ph.D. College of Public Programs, 480-965-6076,
Risley.Curtiss@ASU.edu
Summary: This course focuses on two broad areas of current significance for social work practice; (1) the link between animal abuse and other forms of violence such as domestic violence, child and elder abuse; and (2) the powerful potential that positive connections with animals have for healing and promoting resiliency in human beings while at the same time benefiting the animals. This course examines issues of prevention and treatment and builds practice skills in both areas. It considers animal abuse and healing animal connections within an ecological and empowerment context; and works to build sensitivity to various cultural contexts. Assignments in the course focus on these issues.


Arkansas

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, Arkansas 72204
Course Title:
Animal Law
Instructors:
Philip D. Oliver, School of Law, 1201 McAlmont, Little Rock, AR 72202-5142
501-324-9943, pdoliver@ualr.edu
Summary:
Includes such topics as state and federal animal protection laws, factory farming, vivisection, and statutes covering hunting (including interference with hunting). Students, who present their seminar papers in class, have chosen to write on topics ranging from standing to an examination of the link between sadistic treatment of animals and sadistic treatment of people. Offered for the first time in the Spring of 1999.


California

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution:
University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616
Course Title:
Animal Welfare (ANS 103)
Instructors:
Joy Mench, Department of Animal Science, 530-752-7125, jamench@ucdavis.edu
Summary:
Examines animal welfare from the animals' point of view. Who are animals, and what can they (do they) experience? Which practices compromise their welfare, and which do not? How can management practices and environments be modified to improve the welfare of animals?

BIOLOGY

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Institution:
California State University, San Bernardino, CA 92407
Course Title: Ethics and Animal Use in Science (Biol. 590: Senior Seminar)
Instructor: Richard Fehn, Ph.D., Department of Biology, (909) 880-5310
Summary: Examines the scientific, philosophical and political issues surrounding the use of animals in science, how animal models are selected, and alternatives to animal use. Each meeting is used to address a set of related questions about one aspect of the topic. Selected readings provide a foundation for student panel discussions of the issues. Research proposals are also evaluated. Questions addressed include: Why are animals used for experimentation? What moral obligations do we have to animals? What is pain and distress?

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Institution:
University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106
Course Title: Animals in Human Society: Ethical Issues of Animal Use
Instructor: Jo-Ann Shelton, Environmental Studies Program, 805-893-3806, jsheldon@classics.ucsb.edu
Summary: Identification and exploration of the ethical issues which arise when humans interact with other animals. Analysis of the philosophical debates about the moral status of animals, and examination of the controversies surrounding the extension of human rights concepts to nonhuman animals. Discussion of conflicting attitudes toward the value of animal life in such specific areas as food production, scientific research, recreational activities, pet ownership, and environmental protection.

HISTORY AND HUMANITIES

Institution: California State University, San Bernardino, CA 92407
Course Title: Interpretation and Values
Instructor: Susan Finsen, 909-880-5871, sfinsen@csusb.edu
Summary: This upper division interdisciplinary general education course is designed to allow students to reflect on the values and assumptions implicit in their daily lives, culture, science, media and technology. Examines global environmental crises (global warming), intensive agriculture, and the values that have put us in these crises. Also examines the plight of animals and explores the moral status question.

Institution: University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106
Course Title: History of Animal Use in Science (History 107E/Environmental Studies 107E)
Instructor: Anita Guerrini, Department of History and Program in Environmental Studies, 805-893-7371, guerrini@history.ucsb.edu
Summary: Using a variety of sources, this course will explore the ways humans have thought about and used animals in science and medicine from the 17th century to the present. How has science constructed the boundaries between humans and animals, and what have the consequences been for each?

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: California Western School of Law, 225 Cedar Street, San Diego, CA 92101,
Course Title: Animals and the Law
Instructor: Sonia S. Waisman, Esq., Luce, Forward, Hamilton & Scripps LLP, 619-699-2596, swaisman@luce.com
Summary: The course focuses on the evolution, interpretation and enforcement of laws protecting animals; evaluates whether, how and why such laws should be modified; and considers the ramifications of such change. The objectives are to increase awareness of animal law issues; to evaluate the development of existing laws regarding the use and treatment of animals in human society, the rationale behind them, and their effectiveness; and to stimulate critical thinking regarding ways to improve those laws.

Institution: Hastings College of the Law, 200 McAllister, San Francisco, CA 94102
Course Title: Animal Law
Instructor: Bruce Wagman, 415-896-0666, baw@mj-sflaw.com
Summary: A survey of the law's understanding and treatment of animals by looking at the development of federal and state policies towards wild, domestic, and companion animals. Specific topics may include the history of animal law, the concept of animals as property, the application of tort and remedies law to injuries by and to pets, protection of animals by anti-cruelty and other laws, and constitutional issues raised in cases involving animals. The course incorporates legal concepts from other fields, encourages critical thought and new approaches to doctrines developed in other areas, and addresses a broadened integration of the realities of animals and society with the particularities of the law.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution:
Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA 95521
Course Title: Animal Ethics
Instructor: Susan J. Armstrong, Department of Philosophy, 707-826-5754, sja3@axe.humboldt.edu
Summary: A seminar course offered for the first time in Spring 2000. Deals with animal awareness, moral development, language ability, pain and suffering, personhood, factory farming, experimentation, genetic engineering, sport hunting, legal rights and zoos.

PSYCHOLOGY

Institution:
California State University, Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099
Course Title: People, Ethics, and Other Animals (INST 348)
Instructor: Carol Raupp, Department of Psychology, 661-664-2370, craupp@csub.edu
Summary: Examines peoples' attitudes toward other animal species and the current psychological research describing our differing relationships with companion animals, animals used for food, animals used in research, sports or entertainment, and so-called "wild" animals. This course is now available online to students everywhere.

Institution: California State University, Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099
Course Title: People and Animal Companions (INST 349)
Instructor: Carol Raupp, Department of Psychology, 661-664-2370, craupp@csub.edu
Summary: The psychology of peoples' relationships with animal companions (pets). Topics include motivations for pet-keeping, personality research, attachment, companion animals and human development, and ethical issues in relationships with animal companions. This course is now available online to students everywhere.

Institution: California State University, Bakersfield, CA 93311-1099
Course Title: Applied Experience in Human-Animal Studies (INST 351)
Instructor: Carol Raupp, Department of Psychology, 661-664-2370, craupp@csub.edu
Summary: Volunteer experience in a community setting relevant to human-animal studies. Only one unit may be earned per term, and no more than three units may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree. Prerequisites: INST 348 and three additional units in Human-Animal Studies courses. Offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Supervised online and available to students everywhere.

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, CA 94002
Course Title: Animals in Society (SO/PY 180)
Instructor: Cheryl Joseph, Ph.D., 650-508-3586, cjoseph@ndnu.edu
Summary: This course begins by exploring capabilities of animals other than humans along with the implications of these faculties. Using experts in their various fields, we examine the bond between people and animals, focusing on the cruelty and compassion connections, then discuss ways in which humans and our furry, feathered and finned friends can enhance the lives of others.

Institution: Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, CA 94002
Course Title: Animals in Literature (SO/EN 181)
Instructor: Ken White
Summary: Through fiction, poetry, drama and literary nonfiction, this course examines the varied and significant roles that animals have played in human life throughout history and continue to play in contemporary society. Works by U.S. authors as well as some from other cultures are read to explore the ways in which literature uses companion animals and wildlife, real as well as imagined, to shape and reflect social values. Readings are approached from sociological and literary perspectives. Students are asked to develop creative writing exercises with animals as theme and/or character along with a small literary body of their own.

Institution: Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, CA 94002
Course Title: Sociology of the Animal-Human Bond (SO/PY 182)
Instructor: Cheryl Joseph, Ph.D., 650-508-3586, cjoseph@ndnu.edu
Summary: This course explores the unique relationship that humans share with other animals, the implications of this relationship and the potential. We examine the attitudes our society holds toward animals other than ourselves as well as how and why our social institutions create these attitudes. We also address the connection between animal and human cruelty along with the similarities between animal oppression and racism, sexism, ageism and social class privilege. Finally, we direct attention to the ways in which animals enrich human lives and humans can benefit other animals. This course uses historical, cultural, institutional, interpersonal and environmental perspectives to examine the human-other animal bond.

Institution: Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, CA 94002
Course Title: Animals, People and the Environment (SO/SM 183)
Instructor: Cheryl Joseph, Ph.D., 650-508-3586, cjoseph@ndnu.edu and Rob Fark
Summary: By combining natural science with social science, this class explores the interactions between people, wildlife and our ecological environment. We focus on the value of animal life and nature in such specific areas as conservation/wildlife management, food production, energy needs assessment, biomes and populations, urban sprawl, biomagnification and chemical pollution, environmental disease, endangerment, extinction, globalization and ecotourism within the context of social inequality and social justice. Particular emphasis is given to the deforestation of Africa and the Amazon; the introduction of kingfish into the Quechua and Imara Indians of Southern Peru; the Arctic wilderness and oil drilling; mountaintop removal in West Virginia; chemical pollution of the Great Lakes; creation of compatible eco-environments in Northern Minnesota; and the impact of tourism on Moorea. This course uses historical, biological, sociological, cultural, institutional and environmental perspectives to examine the connections between animals, people and our environment.

VETERINARY MEDICINE

Institution: University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616
Course Title: Human-Animal Interactions: Benefits and Issues (PHR 106)
Instructor: Professor Lynette Hart, 530-757-8444, lahart@ucdavis.edu
Summary: The contributions of animals to human society, including historic, anthropologic, developmental, human health and therapeutic perspectives, as well as the effects of humans on animals.

Institution: University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616
Course Title: Human-Animal Interaction in Veterinary Science (PHR 406)
Instructor: Professor Lynette Hart, 530-757-8444, lahart@ucdavis.edu
Summary: From the perspectives of veterinarians and their clients' needs. Human relationships with companion animals, and secondarily, on food, laboratory, and wild animals. Emphasis on the benefits of companion animals for human mental and physical well-being, the role of animals in the human life cycle, societal traditions in keeping animals, and types of specialized and more typical relationships with animals.

Institution: University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616
Course Title: Behavior and Biology of Mice as Domestic Animals (PHR 408)
Instructor: Professor Lynette Hart, 530-757-8444, lahart@ucdavis.edu
Summary: Background and current issues in laboratory mouse biology and welfare, including the development and purposes of specialized strains of mice, constraints on their care and environmental enrichment, relevant legislation and regulation, and the human benefits of their use.


Colorado

ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY

Institution: University of Denver, Denver, Colorodo
Course Title: Integration of Animals into Therapeutic Settings
Instructors: Philip Tedeschi, MSSW, LCSW, Graduate School of Social Work
Summary: This course is the prerequisite course required for the Animal-Assisted Social Work Certificate offered at the University of Denver. It is also a second year elective and will expose all participants to the use of animals as an adjunct to Social Work practice. The course explores the human-animal bond and potential for therapeutic intervention with the animal as teacher, therapist, facilitator, and companion in a number of therapeutic settings. It focuses on core skills for social workers seeking to integrate this clinical approach into their practice.
Website: See www.du.edu/gssw/professionalDev/animalsHumanHealth/ for more information on the Animals and Human Health Certificate Program.

Institution: University of Denver, Denver, Colorodo
Course Title: Animal Assisted Application to Social Work Practice
Instructors: Philip Tedeschi, MSSW, LCSW, Graduate School of Social Work
Summary: This course is the second, more in-depth application course required for the Animal-Assisted Social Work Certificate offered at the University of Denver. It is also a second year elective and will expose all participants to the use of animals as an adjunct to Social Work practice. Social Work Practice provides a comprehensive examination of approaches to Animal-Assisted Social Work (AASW) and emphasizes clinical application skills utilized with a broad array of persons and in a number of therapeutic settings. Students will learn to design, implement, and analyze the efficacy of AASW approaches within their chosen area of specialization, providing an opportunity to practice these approaches at their field internships. Students will learn to clearly articulate, assess and intervene in "link" violence as it relates to social work pratice and AASW implications.
Website: See http://www.du.edu/gssw/certificate/animalAssisted.htm for more information.

Institution: University of Denver, Denver, Colorodo
Course Title: Animals and Human Health
Instructor: Sue Teumer, steumer@du.edu
Summary: Animals and Human Health course seeks to understand the remarkable human-animal bond and potential for therapeutic intervention with the animal as teacher, therapist, facilitator and companion in a number of therapeutic settings. Focus is placed on developing knowledge, ethics, values and the skills for individuals seeking to integrate these clinical approaches into a wide range of settings. Students will also be expected to examine the link between animal abuse and other forms of violence. This course is designed to provide students a foundation in understanding human and animal connection. Animals can be introduced into a number of therapeutic settings, with diverse populations. The application of Animal-Assisted Therapy/Activities/Leaning (AAT/AAA/AAL) can be used with individuals, groups and families in varied settings.

Institution: University of Denver, Denver, Colorodo
Course Title: Animals and Human Health
Instructor: Sue Teumer, steumer@du.edu
Summary: Animals and Human Health course seeks to understand the remarkable human-animal bond and potential for therapeutic intervention with the animal as teacher, therapist, facilitator and companion in a number of therapeutic settings. Focus is placed on developing knowledge, ethics, values and the skills for individuals seeking to integrate these clinical approaches into a wide range of settings. Students will also be expected to examine the link between animal abuse and other forms of violence. This course is designed to provide students a foundation in understanding human and animal connection. Animals can be introduced into a number of therapeutic settings, with diverse populations. The application of Animal-Assisted Therapy/Activities/Leaning (AAT/AAA/AAL) can be used with individuals, groups and families in varied settings.

 

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture
Instructor: Bernard Rollin, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: This pioneering course has been a part of the required block for agricultural students at Colorado State University since 1980. It deals with issues of farm animal welfare, ethical theory, and emerging social ethics for animals.

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Agricultural Ethics
Instructors: Bernard Rollin, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu and Robert Zimdahl, 970-491-5261, r.zimdahl@colostate.edu
Summary: This course, open to all undergraduates, deals with issues such as pesticides and herbicides, animal welfare, environmental despoliation, family farms, agricultural biotechnology, rural communities, and husbandry-based versus industry-based agriculture.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Animal Ethics
Instructor: Bernard Rollin, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: Surveys some of the major issues that have emerged in the past 30 years regarding the moral status of animals.

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Ethical Issues in Genetic Engineering
Instructor: Bernard Rollin, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: Examines ethical issues and questions that emerge from the new technologies of genetic engineering.

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Science and Ethics
Instructor: Bernard Rollin, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: Offered for graduate students in the biomedical sciences, this course deals with research on human subjects, research on animal subjects, scientific ideology, biosafety issues, science and democracy, fraud and deception in science, and issues in genetic engineering and biotechnology. [This course is also offered for Cell and Molecular Biology majors]

PHYSIOLOGY

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Proper Care and Use of Laboratory Animals
Instructors: Bernard Rollin and Martha L. Kesel, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: An approach to ethical and practical issues that arise in the course of doing animal research. Topics include animal pain and distress, anesthesia, analgesia, euthanasia, surgical technique, and trying to justify animal research.
Status: Taught on an occasional basis.

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: University of Colorado
Course Title: Animals and Society (SOCY 4017)
Instructor: Professor Leslie Irvine, Department of Sociology, 303-492-7039, irvinel@colorado.edu
Summary: Non-human animals constitute an integral part of human society. They figure heavily in our language, food, clothing, family structure, economy, education, entertainment, science, and recreation. The many ways we use animals produce ambivalent and contradictory attitudes toward them. We treat some species of animals as friends and family members (e.g., dogs and cats), while others we treat as commodities (e.g., cows, pigs, and chickens). This course will examine the complex role of animals in human society. In particular, it will explore the various social constructions of animals. It will challenge conventional representations of non-human animals, presenting instead the evidence that many animals rely on cognition and emotion. It will examine evidence for the link between animal and human cruelty. It will also consider the similarities between animal oppression and the oppression of other human beings. Finally, the course will explore the moral status and rights of animals in human society.

VETERINARY MEDICINE AND MEDICINE

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Veterinary Medical Ethics
Instructors: Bernard Rollin and A. P. Knight, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: This pioneering course, implemented in 1978, is required in the veterinary medicine curriculum at Colorado State University. It deals with ethical theory, animal welfare, and animal rights.

Institution: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Course Title: Proper Care and Use of Laboratory Animals
Instructors: Bernard Rollin and Martha L. Kesel, 970-491-6315, bernard.rollin@colostate.edu
Summary: An approach to ethical and practical issues that arise in the course of doing animal research. Topics include animal pain and distress, anesthesia, analgesia, euthanasia, surgical technique, and trying to justify animal research.
Status: Taught on an occasional basis.


Connecticut

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459
Course Title: Humans-Animals-Nature (Philosophy 150)
Instructor: Professor Lori Gruen, Department of Philosophy, 860-685-2008, lgruen@mail.wesleyan.edu
Summary: Due to unprecedented ecological degradation and enormous inequalities in the distribution of the means of flourishing, human beings all over the world are being forced to reconsider their relationship to each other and the nonhuman world. In this course, we explore the character, conditions, and concerns that shape these troubled relationships. The first part of the course will discuss the philosophical basis for membership in the moral community. Do animals matter? Do future generations matter? Do trees matter? We will spend most of the course exploring how these things matter, if and when they do, by analyzing specific cases/problems: vegetarianism, cultural hunting of whales, environmental racism, and wilderness preservation. The goals of the course are to help you to think critically, to read carefully, to argue well, and to defend your reasoned views about the moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.

Institution: Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT 06810
Course Title: Ethics and the Nonhuman
Instructor: Kristin Aronson, Department of Philosophy and Humanistic Studies, 203-837-8784
Summary: Students learn about the treatment of nonhuman animals by humans, and learn how to argue logically and evaluate moral arguments for and against practices and positions. The emphasis is on critical thinking and development of proficiency in arguing the issues.

SOCIOLOGY

Institution: Central Connecticut State University, 1615 Stanley Street,, New Britain, CT 06050
Course Title: Animals and Society (upper-level sociology)
Instructor: Jessica Greenebaum, Sociology Dept., 860-832-2822, greenebaumj@ccsu.edu
Summary: This course explores the social relationship between humans and animals and examines the social meanings which shape the role and status of animals in society. Some animals are loved as family members, while others are treated as objects to be used by industries and individuals. This course also explores the ideas behind the animal rights and animal welfare movements. This course will introduce you to alternative perspectives and will (hopefully) challenge your standpoint on human-animals relations. We will be discussing controversial and disturbing topics in this class.


District of Columbia

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: Georgetown University Law Center, 600 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001
Course Title: Animal Law Seminar
Instructor: Valerie Stanley, 301-594-3126, valeriejstanley@yahoo.com
Summary: Examines the realities of life and death for animals used for experimentation, food, entertainment and sport, and introduces the federal and state laws governing, and purporting to protect, animals used for these purposes. Examines whether these laws accomplish their purposes through a review of relevant case law and other materials. Addresses the societal, legislative, and judicial mechanisms that maintain animals as property by reviewing and comparing the personal accounts of advocates who have battled government and corporate institutions to effect societal change in other areas. Standing, and legal rights for animals are also addressed. Offered for the first time in January 2000.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: George Washington University, 2121 I Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052
Course Title: Ethics: Theory and Applications
Instructor: David D. DeGrazia, Department of Philosophy, 202-994-6913, ddd@gwu.edu
Summary: This course is an introduction to ethical theory, methods of ethical reasoning, and several concrete moral problems, including ethics and animals. It is based on the assumption that critical ethical reflection and open-minded engagement with diverse viewpoints can improve the quality of moral judgment. Students are expected to identify and rigorously examine their own moral presuppositions and take responsibility for developing a body of ethical reflection that withstands critical scrutiny.

Institution: George Washington University, 2121 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052
Course Title: Moral Status and Personal Identity
Instructor: David D. DeGrazia, Department of Philosophy, 202-994-6913, ddd@gwu.edu
Summary: This course integrates the important and challenging philosophical issues of moral status and personal identity, taking advantage of significant recent developments in the literature, and bringing the treatment of these issues to bear in investigating four areas of practical concern: the definition of death; the authority of advance directives in cases of severe dementia and persistent vegetative states; genetic engineering and cloning; and "cosmetic psychopharmacology." The first part of the course, focusing on moral status, places a strong emphasis on animals.


Florida

HUMANE EDUCATION

Institution: Miami-Dade College, Miami, FL 33176
Course Title: Humane Education: Compassion Across the College Curriculum
Instructor: Joyce DiBenedetto-Colton, Animal Ethics Study Center, 1101 SW 104 St., Miami, FL 33176-3393, 305-237-2990, joyce.dibenedetto@mdc.edu
Summary: The Animal-Ethics Center provides training and educational events for faculty, students and the local community in Miami. The center runs humane education training programs for faculty, encouraging teachers to consider and incorporate ideas of compassion and community in the college curriculum. The center also holds an ‘animal awareness week’ with events, films and keynote, highly reputed speakers [such as Steven Wise and Tom Regan]. The center’s wide reach into the community and its focus on teacher training ensures that their efforts to increase knowledge and understanding of animal issues will be highly effective.

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: St. Thomas University, School of Law, Miami, FL 33076
Course Title: Animal Rights Law
Instructors: Steven Wise, wiseboston@aol.com , 954-648-9864
Summary: Unlike many animal protection or animal law courses taught at American law schools, this course will focus on whether, and to what extent, nonhuman animals ought be entitled to basic legal rights. What the students learn will assist them tomorrow in maneuvering through the world of animal slave law in which they will be forced to practice. But the real value of the course is that it will arm them with the information and skills needed to press for basic legal rights of nonhuman animals when the time to make those arguments arrives.
Course offering information: This course will be offered beginning January 2006.

Institution: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611
Course Title: Animal Rights and the Law (6936)
Instructors: David Hoch, Levin College of Law, 352-375-7156, hoch@gator.net
Summary: Considers the philosophical and jurisprudential arguments in support of the acknowledgment of moral standing for, and more importantly, the granting of legal rights to non-human animals. The writings of animal rights attorney/advocate/philosopher Steven Wise are crucial to this discussion and will be examined in detail, along with the work of other important animal rights attorney/advocates such as Gary Francione. The difference between animal rights and animal welfare, the latter being the philosophical premise upon which most of today's animal law is founded, will also be examined and discussed.
Syllabus: http://bear.cba.ufl.edu/hoch/animallaw/Syllabus.htm
Course offering information: First offered in Spring, 2000.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Miami-Dade Community College, Kendall Campus
Course Title: Ethics (PHI 2600)
Instructor: Charles Fink, 305-237-2030, cfink@mdcc.edu
Summary: Introduces students to some of the most influential theories and writings in ethics, and provides a philosophical framework for thinking constructively about moral problems. Among the problems discussed are abortion, world hunger, euthanasia, and capital punishment, as well as issues in environmental and animal ethics.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Institution: University of Florida, Gainseville, Fl 32611

Course Title: Religion and Animals

Instructor: Richard C. Foltz, Ph.D., 352-392-1625, Theology Department, 513-745-3026, rfoltz@ufl.edu
Summary: Humans are animals, or are they? Most, though not all, religious traditions treat humans and animals as separate categories, with different systems of ethical and values applied to each. How cultures perceive the relationship between animals and humans affects choices about diet, understandings of our place in the world, an increasingly today, the ethics of scientific research.



Idaho

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Institution: University of Idaho

Course Title: Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management

Instructor: Gerry Wright, 885-7990, gwright@uidaho.edu

Summary: Objectives of this course include: "1. To examine the history of human associations with wild animals and how they have influenced human development and the evolution of human values and attitudes. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of human society and its relationship to wild animals in North America. 2. To examine how wild animals are viewed by contemporary society and the impacts that contemporary attitudes are having on traditional wildlife management actions.3. To examine the impacts of recreation on wildlife and wildlife responses to recreationalists."

Course webpage: http://www.cnr.uidaho.edu/wlf520/

 


Illinois

ANIMAL SCIENCE

 

Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
Course Title: Human-Companion Animal Interactions (ANSC 305)
Instructor: Amy Lopez, Department of Animal Sciences, 130 Animal Sciences Laboratory, 1207 West Gregory Dr., 217-333-0625, amylopez@uiuc.edu
Summary: An examination of historical, social, and cultural aspects of human interactions with companion animals (CA). Topics include: human perceptions of CA; benefits of CA; breeding, tail docking, ear cropping, etc.; legal aspects; cruelty and neglect; pet overpopulation; greyhound racing; dissection. Several case studies are also studied. This course serves 25 students per semester.

Sample syllabus: http://labs.ansci.uiuc.edu/companion/teaching/ansc305syllabus.htm

 

Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
Course Title: Humane Education with Companion Animals (ANSCI 215)
Instructor: Prof. Anna Lutgen, Department of Animal Sciences, 130 Animal Sciences Laboratory, 1207 West Gregory Drive, 217-333-0625, alutgen@uiuc.edu

Program Coordinator: Amy Fischer, Ph.D., Teaching Associate and Extension Specialist, Companion Animal Biology and Humane Education, 217-333-6462, afischer@uiuc.edu
Summary: This course explores the topic of humane education as it pertains to companion animals, primarily cats and dogs. The course addresses the historical aspects of domestication and humane education as well as modern-day relationships between humans and companion animals, principally in American Society. Pet overpopulation and resulting animal shelter issues are discussed in detail. The process of developing and evaluating humane education programs is explored. Selection, behavior, and care of companion animals are discussed with a focus on promoting the human-companion animal bond, behavioral wellness and safety. Animal protection laws, animal control laws and the connection between animal cruelty and violent behavior toward humans are also examined. This course has been taught since 2000. The class serves 50 students per semester and also fulfills the university's general education requirement for advanced composition.
Sample syllabus: http://labs.ansci.uiuc.edu/companion/teaching/ansc215syllabus.htm

 

ANIMAL STUDIES

 

Institution: DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60604

Course Title: Externship: Animals in Contemporary Life
Instructors: Betta Lo Sardo, School for New Learning, Oak Forest, IL 60452, blosardo@depaul.edu , 708-633-9091

Summary: This faculty designed independent study course is designed to address the externship requirement of the School for New Learning. Students will consider their learning styles by revisiting David Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory first introduced in the initial stages of the SNL program. Learners will develop ways of expanding their learning repertoires, and of examining their own ideas as well as those of experts. Specifically, students will pursue information on the historical connections between animals and humans, and on philosophies and issues concerning breeding and use of domestic animals. Students will also be exposed to current issues in animal welfare, including a volunteer experience in an animal shelter. In this course, faculty will provide a framework for assessing the roles and condition of animals particularly domestic animals, in our culture. Readings will include Peter Singer's noted work on animal experimentation, Animal Liberation. Students will track their own interests through further readings and commentary on their experiences.
Course website: http://snl.depaul.edu/about/fac_directory.php#L (see under LoSardo)
Course offering information: This course is offered every quarter.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

 

Institution: Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455-1390
Course Title: Anthrozoology
Instructor: Instructor: Patricia K. Anderson, PhD. Office phone: 309-298-1108. Email:
pk-anderson@wiu.edu
Summary: This course examines how different cultural values, attitudes and ideas influence human perception of, and behavior toward, animals. It examines key topics such as the domestication of animals, the use of animals for food production and entertainment, the role of animals in religion and many other aspects of the relationship between animals and human society, such as the role of animals in art and literature, while addressing contemporary issues relating to animals.

 

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115
Course Title: Animals, Ethics, and the Environment
Instructor: Mylan Engel, Jr., Department of Philosophy, 815-753-6405, mylan-engel@niu.edu
Summary: This course seeks to determine whether and to what extent we have duties and obligations toward animals and the environment. Prominent ethical theories are first surveyed, then a range of questions are examined from the perspective of several prominent ethical theories. These questions include:
- What is the moral status of animals?
- Is it wrong to kill animals for fun?
- Is it worse to kill animals than it is to kill plants?
- Is it wrong to torture animals?
- Is it wrong to wear animals?
- Is vegetarianism morally obligatory for people living in modern societies?


Indiana

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Course Title: Applied Animal Welfare (ANSC 404)
Instructors: Department of Animal Science
Summary: Historical, current, and legislative aspects of animal welfare; differentiating between animal welfare and animal rights; interpreting, appraising, and measuring animal welfare; resolving animal welfare problems in variable conditions.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1360
Course Title: Ethics and Animals (PHIL 280)
Instructor: Lilly-Marlene Russow, Department of Philosophy, 765-494-4290, lmrussow@purdue.edu
Summary: An exploration through the study of historical and contemporary philosophical writings of basic moral issues as they apply to our treatment of animals. Rational understanding of the general philosophical problems raised by practices such as experimentation on animals and meat-eating are emphasized.

Institution: Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1360
Course Title: Environmental Ethics (PHIL 290)
Instructor: Lilly-Marlene Russow, Department of Philosophy, 765-494-4290, lmrussow@purdue.edu
Summary: An introduction to philosophical issues surrounding debates about the environment and our treatment of it. Topics may include endangered species, the "triangular affair" between animal rights and environmental ethics, the scope and limits of cost-benefit analyses, and duties to future generations. This course was first offered in 1980.

Institution: Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN 47933
Course Title: Animals and Ethics
Instructor: Stephen Webb, Associate Professor of Religion and Philosophy, 765-361-6264
Summary: Readings include:
- Carol Adams, The Sexual Politics of Meat
- Andrew Linzey, Animal Theology
- Keith Tester, Animals and Society
- Vicki Hearne, Adam's Task

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Institution: Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47401
Course Title: Science, Religion, and the Environment
Instructor: Lisa Sideris, Department of Religious Studies, 812-330-1573
Summary: Examines arguments that hold scientific and religious world views responsible for our environmental crisis and the devaluation of nonhuman animal life. The structure of the course follows a thesis-antithesis-synthesis format. We start with a historical survey of Christian thinkers (Augustine, Aquinas, Calvin, Luther) up to and including modern Christian thinkers who have been criticized by environmentalists. We then cover scientific thinkers such as Bacon and Descartes, and modern physicists. The third section involves a reconsideration of the thesis that science and/or religion have been responsible for environmental problems and disregard for animals. We look at thinkers both in science and religion who have contributed positively to the human-nature relationship, both in the past and present.


Iowa

LITERATURE

Institution: University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Course Title: Literature and Society: Capturing Animals
Instructors: Teresa Mangum
Summary: In this course, the overarching goal will be to develop an understanding of what animals "mean" in our culture and of the many ways we use animals--as companions, as metaphors and images to represent fears, pleasures, and assumptions, as food, as objects for pleasure and sadly for abuse, as commodities, as projections of qualities we wish to possess. We will be participating in a new educational approach called Service-Learning so that in additon to using literary and theoretical printed and visual work as our course texts, we will also be using your own experiences and reflections. During your service at the Iowa City/Coralville Animal Center, the stories and insights that you collect there will essentially form an additional course text. In effect, we will be "capturing animals" throughout the semester: in fiction, in the Animal Center, in advertisements, in theoretical accounts of human-animal relations, in community policies governing animals, in university policies on animal research, in popular culture, and in politics.

 

Kansas

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-0201
Course Title: Contemporary Issues in Animal Science
Instructor: Janice Swanson, Department of Animal Science and Industry, 134C Weber Hall, 785-532-1244, jswanson@ksu.edu
Summary: This student-driven, experiential learning course uses the development of animal rights philosophy to teach students how to think critically and to illustrate the development of issues from inception to the political arena. Projects involve problem solving; information acquisition, assimilation and communication skills; network development; team work; conflict resolution; case study and debate; and use of electronic information/communication technologies. Two major projects involve the production of a class briefing report on a variety of animal issues and a mock congressional hearing with students from the University of Nebraska. Offered every spring.


Kentucky

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Transylvania University, 300 North Broadway, Lexington, KY 40508
Course Title: Animal Minds/Human Ethics
Instructor: Jack Furlong, Professor, Philosophy Program
Summary: An examination of human attitudes and obligations to non-human animals through an exploration of questions surrounding the existence, kinds and implications of mental states in non-human animals; the conditions for and implications of ascribing rights to these non-human species; and, overall, the ways in which ideology figures in such arguments.


Louisiana

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: McNeese State University, P.O. Box 92335, Lake Charles, LA 70609
Course Title: Animal Ethics
Instructor: Stephen Hanson, Department of Social Sciences, 337-475-5311, shanson@mcneese.edu
Summary: What ethical obligations do we have towards animals, if any, and why? What ought we conclude about factory farming, the use of animals in medical research, and our general attitude towards nonhumans? This course will examine these and other related questions in light of several of the more prevalent ethical theories in today's philosophy. We will examine utilitarianism, as elaborated by Mill and later by Peter Singer, and the way the greatest happiness principle it discusses may affect our obligations towards animals, at least those that feel pleasure and pain. We will also look at contractarian theory, and ask whether or not animals are to be included in the social contract. Finally, we will discuss how Kant's notion of rights and respect for persons should impact our attitude about possible animal persons.


Maine

HUMANE EDUCATION

Institution: International Institute for Humane Education
Course Title: Introduction to Humane Education (EIH 620)
Instructor: Zoe Weil, International Institute for Humane Education, P.O. Box 260, Surry, ME 04684, (207) 667-1025, zoe@iihed.org
Summary: This directed study introduces the field of humane education and helps students acquire skills and knowledge needed by the humane educator. Specifically, the course introduces teaching and learning styles and provides strategies to present and communicate principles and issues of humane education in the community. (Distance learning module available through affiliation with the International Institute for Humane Education, Surry, ME) Other interrelated humane education courses in the program include Animal Protection, Environmental Preservation, Culture and Media, and Human Rights.

Institution: International Institute for Humane Education
Course Title: Animal Protection (EIH 630)
Instructors: Zoe Weil, International Institute for Humane Education, P.O. Box 260, Surry, ME 04684, (207) 667-1025, zoe@iihed.org
Summary: Prerequisite: EIH620 Through books, articles and videos, students are exposed to a variety of issues (animal agriculture, experimentation,entertainment, hunting, companion animal) and views pertaining to animal protection and rights. This module provides information for students to consider and evaluate for the purposeof educating others—children, teens, or adults—who play various roles in society and assume different positions on these issues. Students respond in short written assignments, essays and projects, and participate in regular consultation with the instructor. (Distance learning module available through affiliation with the International Institute for Humane Education, Surry, ME) Other interrelated humane education courses in the program include Animal Protection, Environmental Preservation, Culture and Media, and Human Rights.

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: University of Southern Maine, P.O. Box 9300, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04104-9300
Course Title: Animal Abuse (CRM 327/SOC 380)
Instructor: Piers Beirne, Department of Criminology, 207-780-4105, beirne@maine.edu
Summary: A new undergraduate course on the sociology of animal abuse.


Maryland

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
Course Title: Animal Welfare (AN SCI 453)
Instructors: W. Ray Stricklin, Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, 301-405-1382, ws31@umail.umd.edu
Summary: Ethical concerns pertinent to the use of animals in modern society, historical and philosophical aspects of human/animal interrelationships, animal intelligence and awareness, and the treatment of animals in agriculture and scientific research will be considered.

ANIMAL STUDIES

Institution: Anne Arundel Community College, Anne Arundel, MD 21012

Course Title: Pets and Parenting: Creating a Positive Experience

Instructor: Joseph Lamp, Ph.D., 410-647-7100

Summary: Introducing companion animals and caring for them in the household pose unique challenges and positive opportunities for parents to teach social skills, and responsibilities to children. Understand the role companion animals can play in the American household today and their usefulness in the socialization of children. Learn how to create and maintain a positive experience for your children from the time of animal adoption, to helping them come to terms with coping with pet loss. Gain an understanding of the laws pertaining to pet ownership in Anne Arundel County. Focus will be on dogs and cats as companion animals.

Institution: Community College of Baltimore County, Dundalk, Baltimore, MD 21222
Course Title: Animal and SocietyOnline Course (ANST 101)
Instructor: Melba Green, 410-664-2236, x315, mgreen2@ccbcmd.edu. Spring 2007.
Summary: Explores the ways animals are viewed by various subcultures in American society. Students explore sociological, historical, economic, philosophical, and public policy issues regarding the treatment of animals. Factory farming, medical research, hunting and trapping, and entertainment industries will be examined.

 


Massachusetts

ANIMAL WELFARE

Institution: Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536
Course Title: Masters of Science in Animal Welfare and Public Policy
Instructor: Gary Patronek, Director, 508-839-7991
Coordinator: Annete Rauch, annette.rauch@tufts.edu, 508-887-4318
Summary: Course includes a variety of speakers, both Tufts faculty and outside speakers. Main course goal for the fall semester: give students the tools they need to create change for improving the lives of animals. Main course goal for the spring semester: examine specific groups of animals and look at the current challenges and emerging issues particular to that group of animals. Example of course content: Fall semester: I. Historical Perspective and Defining Public Policy, II. Tools for Creating Change, III. Understanding the Legal System, IV. Analysis of Three Case Studies. Spring Semester: five modules, focusing on: farm animals, companion animals, domestic wildlife, research animals and international wildlife.
Course website: www.tufts.edu/vet/cfa

MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Institution: Worcester State College, 486 Chandler Street, Worcester, MA 01602-2597, dgce@worcester.edu
Course Title: Symbolism and Spirit of the Animal Kingdom: Cross-curricular Activities for the K-8 Classroom
Instructors: Belinda Recio, Center for Effective Instruction, 508-929-8873
Summary: There is a natural affinity between humankind and other animals, especially in childhood. This course honors and celebrates animal presence in our lives by regarding animals (and their symbolic/spiritual signatures) as teachers. In the first part of this course we will explore the human-animal relationship as embodied in the symbolic language of mythology, folklore, spiritual traditions, poetry, and visual arts from a diversity of world cultures throughout different eras of human history. We will look at how our experience of animals and our participation in their "otherness" helps us to understand our world and ourselves, particularly during childhood. In the second half of the course we will integrate the subject matter by developing and sharing lesson plans and building bridges across the curriculum.

NUTRITION AND NATURAL SCIENCES

Institution: Hampshire College, Amherst, MA 01002
Course Title: Animals in Human Society: Relationships, Bioethics, and Welfare (NS 130)
Instructor: Susan Prattis, School of Natural Science, 413-559-5632
Summary: Examines the various spiritual, artistic, and literary depictions of animal species across cultures; explores the philosophic and scientific underpinnings of the concept of animal welfare and its application in settings as diverse as rodeo, biomedical research, education, and wildlife conservation; examines whether animals are cognate beings; describes the legislative, economic, and comparative health impact of animal use within societal contexts.
[This course was funded by the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Technology Educational Collaborative (STEMTEC) program of the National Science Foundation.]

PSYCHOLOGY

Institution: Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115
Course Title: Experiments in Learning and Motivation (PSY 1530)
Instructor: Perrin Cohen, Department of Psychology, cohen@neu.edu
Summary: Presents alternatives to using laboratory animals for teaching purposes and thus provides an ongoing forum for discussing issues concerning the use of animals in research and teaching.

Institution: Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115
Course Title: Psychological Research and Personal Values (PSY 1610)
Instructor: Perrin Cohen, Department of Psychology, cohen@neu.edu
Summary: Considers historical, psychological, philosophical, sociological, and spiritual perspectives regarding animal experimentation. Includes evaluation of research projects through written and oral reports.

Institution: Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115
Course Title: Ethics in Research Psychology (PSY 3193)
Instructor: Perrin Cohen, Department of Psychology, cohen@neu.edu
Summary: This graduate seminar is required of all psychology graduates. It addresses ethical concerns and dilemmas that psychology students and professional research psychologists face in acquiring and using scientific knowledge.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Institution: Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
Course Title: Animals and Religion
Instructor: Kimberley Patton, Harvard Divinity School, 617-496-3395, kimberley_patton@harvard.edu
Summary: Focuses on the symbolism and ritual function of animals in human religious worlds. Using particular cultural histories as paradigms, considers themes such a cosmogony, hierarchy, magic, metamorphosis, antinomianism, prophecy, mimesis, hunting, sacrifice, and the role of fantastic creatures. Central to the course is the evaluation of developmentalist and other theoretical models and their impact on the history of religion. (This course is taught periodically. Please contact the instructor for scheduling.)

Institutions: Tufts University (undergraduate students), Medford, MA 02155; and Episcopal Divinity School (graduate students), Cambridge, MA 01238
Course Title: Religion, Science, and Other Animals
Instructor: Paul Waldau, Center for Animals and Public Policy, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Rd., North Grafton, MA 01536-1895, 508-887-4671, paulwaldau@aol.com
Summary: Focuses on how nonhuman animals have been seen in both religious and scientific circles. Prompts the student to ask a wide range of questions, including:
1. To what extent have religious traditions affected the ways in which contemporary scientists view and speak about animals other than humans?
2. In what ways do contemporary religious traditions now deal with new findings of various life sciences that are pertinent to an understanding of nonhuman animals?
Answers to these questions are explored in several ways, including an examination of whether the vocabularies and concepts used by those who practice both the physical and "softer" sciences when talking about animals outside the human species remain value-laden. The course also seeks clarification of the claims about other animals generally implicit and explicit in many religious traditions' writings and beliefs.
Status: This course recently won an award in an international competition sponsored by the Templeton Foundation for courses dealing with religion and science. It is also open to students at the other nine schools in the Boston Theological Institute.


Michigan

ANTHROPOLOGY

Institution: Albion College, Albion, MI
Course Title: Animals & Human Societies (A/S 220)
Instructor: Molly H. Mullin, Department of Anthropology and Sociology,
317 Robinson Hall, 517-629-0432, mmullin@albion.edu
Summary: Examines animal-human relationships in a cross-cultural, historical perspective. Considers the politics of classification, how animals have served as a mirror for human identities, how animal-human relationships can provide a convenient window from which to study human societies, and how ideas about animals and human-animal relationships have changed over time. Specific cases include cockfighting in Bali, rabies eradication and anti-vivisection campaigns in 19th century England, Sea World, slaughterhouses in France, and xenotransplantation in Sweden.

SOCIOLOGY

Institution: Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Course Title: Animals and Social Transformations (SOC 840)
Instructor: Prof. Linda Kalof, Department of Sociology, lkalof@msu.edu
Summary: This course is an historical overview of the relationship between humans and animals and how those relationships have changed with changing social conditions. Designed to enhance the Sociology Department's theme in Global Transformations, the course is the first formal, regularly scheduled graduate course in animal studies and is open to graduate students in the College of Social Sciences. Offered in the Spring of every year.

 

Minnesota

ANTHROPOLOGY

Institution: University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN
Course Title: Perspectives: Interrelationships of People and Animals in Society Today (UC 4301, CVM 6050, SACS 3050)
Instructors: Pam Hand, DVM, 612-625-3140, handx002@umn.edu;
Cassia Drake, 612-729-1207, drake001@umn.edu
Summary: This course explores various aspects of the interrelationships of people and animals in society today, including the ecological, environmental, cultural, economic, social, psychological, and health/medical dimensions of these interrelationships. Multidisciplinary knowledge of how and why these factors interact is considered to be essential to a better understanding of what is often called the human-animal bond. The course is concerned with the ethical/moral dimension of human-animal interrelationships. Students will be introduced to different philosophical perspectives and moral positions on specific human-animal relationships and familiarized with certain processes of ethical decision-making. In this way, the course should prepare students to arrive at their own moral/ethical decisions with respect to people-animal relationships in their personal, professional or public life. Thus, this course aims:
1. To develop understanding of the issues involved in relationships between people and animals.
2. To engage in critical considerations of differing philosophical views regarding these issues.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057
Course Title: Animals: Minds, Morals and Nature (Phil/ENTS 243)
Instructor: Dale Jamieson, Henry R. Luce Professor in Human Dimensions of Global Change, 507-646-4121, djamieso@carleton.edu
Summary: Discusses the relationships of humans to animals in the philosophy of mind, ethics, and environmental policy. Among the questions explored are: Do animals have minds? Do humans have duties to animals? How seriously should we take the interests of individual animals in our decision-making? How should the interests of animals be weighed against various environmental goods such as the conservation of rare plants? The course is strongly focused on student participation, and encourages critical thinking, argumentation, and formation and refinement of one's personal viewpoints.

Institution: St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN 56301
Course Title: Topics in Ethics: Animal Ethics (BH 123)
Instructor: Jordan Curnutt, Department of Philosophy, 320-255-4114 or 320-255-2234, jcurnutt@stcloudstate.edu
Summary: Examines moral issues arising from our treatment of nonhuman animals. Questions explored include: What is the moral status of animals? Do they have moral rights? Do animals feel pain? Are they conscious? Do they have desires and beliefs? What are the moral implications of attributing certain mental states to animals? Is there a moral problem with euthanizing companion animals?

 

Missouri

LITERATURE

Institution: Webster University, Saint Louis, MO
Course Title: Perspectives: Humans and Other Animals (English2110)
Instructor: Karla Armbruster, Associate Professor, armbruka@webster.edu , 314-961-2660, ext. 7577
Summary: Almost all works of literature include animals, no doubt because of the many ways that human lives are intertwined with those of other animals. But we often don't pay close attention to how these animals are represented in the literature we read, particularly if they exist on the peripheries of the human story rather than serving as the focus. In this course, we will put what we might call "literary beasts" in the spotlight, reading a wide variety of fiction, poetry, and essays that somehow address the relationship between humans and other animals, whether the animals function as symbols, realistic "beasts," competitors or allies in the human struggle for existence, fellow creatures with acknowledged moral standing, or even the narrators of stories and the speakers of poems. We will ask what these varied representations of animals can tell us about the different human cultures which produced them, what--if anything--we can learn from them about "real" animals, and how they might affect our own relationships with the animals who touch our lives in so many ways.
Course offering information: This course was first taught in Spring 2005. It will usually be taught every two years. It will probably be taught again in Fall 2006 or Fall 2007.


Nebraska

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178
Course Title: Environmental Ethics (PHL 354)
Instructor: William O. Stephens, Department of Philosophy, 402-280-2632, stphns@creighton.edu
Summary: This ethics course examines what duties and responsibilities human beings have to the natural environment and the organisms within it. If speciesism is morally unacceptable by unjustifiably excluding nonhuman animals from the moral community, then what exactly are our ethical obligations to nonhuman animals? If anthropocentrism is in general defective, what implications do these defects have for the moral standing of individual plants, insects, and animals, entire species of organisms, waters, land, ecosystems, and the planet as a whole.


New Hampshire

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824
Course Title: Animals Rights and Societal Issues (ANSC 602)
Instructor: William A. Condon, bill.condon@unh.edu
Summary: Undertakes a thorough examination of value judgments and belief structures as well as the empirical evidence involved in the issue of animal rights. Aims not to arrive at policy decisions, but to get students thinking about the issue.

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 02755
Course Title: Animals and Society
Instructor: Judy E. Stern, Ethics Institute at Dartmouth College, 603-650-8218 (Ethics Institute: 603-646-1263), judy.e.stern@dartmouth.edu
Summary: This course explores a variety of topics in which the practice of scientific research may require moral decision making. Through case analysis and discussion we will help students to distinguish behaviors that are morally questionable from those that are morally encouraged. Topics will include deception in research, research methodology, mentoring and interpersonal interaction, publication, institutional responsibilities, and human and animal experimentation. The course is taught by a team of basic scientists and philosophers. It is open to all graduate students and may be used to fill the ethics requirement for students on NIH training grants.

Institution: Keene State College, Keene, NH 03435-3400
Course Title: Environmental Sociology (SOC 399)
Instructor: Kathleen R. Johnson, Dept. of Sociology, 603-358-2594, drkjohnson@aol.com
Summary: Examines some of the important concepts and theories used by environmental sociologists to address the following substantive issues: how society and the economy have developed their relationship to the environment; efforts to expand our moral circle to include nonhuman life; a variety of environmental movements such as the environmental justice movement and the animal rights movement; how we measure and interpret studies of environmental concern; and some of the problems and possible solutions of building sustainable and alternative environmental societies.


New Jersey

ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY

Institution: Camden County College, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Course Title: Independent Study Course in Animal-Assisted Therapy and Animal-Assisted Activities
Instructor: Phil Arkow, Animal Technology Program, arkowpets@snip.net
Coordinator: Kathy Forsythe, Continuing Education Office, 856-374-4955, kforsythe@camdencc.edu
Summary: A 12-week Continuing Education Certificate program course offered in the Fall semester, combining supervised independent study, clinical internship, and research components. Targeted to professionals and volunteers who are already working in the AAT/AAA fields and who have a firm grounding in the principles of the human-animal bond and its therapeutic applications. Instruction is individualized to each student's research needs and internship opportunities.

Institution: Camden County College, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Course Title: Survey Course in Animal-Assisted Therapy and Animal-Assisted Activities
Instructor: Phil Arkow, Animal Technology Program, arkowpets@snip.net
Coordinator: Kathy Forsythe, Continuing Education Office, 856-374-4955, kforsythe@camdencc.edu
Summary: A 12-week Continuing Education Certificate program course offered in the Spring and Fall semesters to introduce students to the human-companion animal bond and its therapeutic applications in a variety of healing environments. Designed for professionals in the animal care and human health fields as well as individuals seeking vocational and volunteer opportunities. Curriculum includes renowned guest lecturers and field trips to explore such topics as AAT in hospitals, nursing homes, and children's institutions; therapeutic riding; animal welfare issues; the human-companion animal bond in different cultures; service animals; pet loss; animal behavior; and the link between animal abuse and interpersonal violence. For students who are unable to attend locally, a Distance Learning version is available through Harcum College in Bryn Mawr, PA.

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: Rutgers Law School, Newark, NJ 07102
Course Title: This is an entire program in animal rights law; the focus is on clinical legal education, so the course content changes every semester.
Instructors: Gary L. Francione and Anna E. Charlton (Director), The Animal Rights Law Center, 15 Washington Street, 201-648-5989
Summary: Students receive six credits per semester, which represents about one-half of the total academic credits taken by the average law student per semester. Students spend an average of 18�24 hours per week working on animal rights cases, and attend a comprehensive weekly seminar on the human/non-human relationship.
Status: This program has been closed.


New Mexico

HISTORY AND HUMANITIES

Institution: University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131
Course Title: Animal Activism
Instructor: Tami Harbolt, American Studies Department, 310 Ortega Hall, 505-277-3929, athnadot@unm.edu
Summary: This evening course introduces students to the history and philosophy of animal rights and welfare. The 19th and 20th century humane movements coincided with other historical social rights movements, such as temperance, abolition, suffrage, and civil rights. Studying the rights of animals allows for a reading of Western culture that considers gender, class, ethnicity, the role of scientific authority, and an exploration of the species boundary. Explores both pro and con arguments pertaining to meat eating, scientific research, pet keeping, hunting, vermin control, and wildlife preservation.

SOCIOLOGY

Institution: Albuquerque TVI College, Albuquerque, NM 87106
Course Title: Animals and Society
Instructor: Margo DeMello, Arts & Sciences Department, 505-771-3157, mdemello@tvi.edu
Summary: This course explores the spaces that animals occupy in human social and cultural worlds and the interactions humans have with them. Central to this course will be an exploration of the ways in which animal lives intersect with human societies. We will also examine how different human groups construct a range of identities for themselves and for others through animals.


New York

ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY

Institution: Mercy College, New York
Course Title: Animal Assisted Therapy (Course as part of Certificate Program)
Instructor: Suz Brooks, Psy.D., Adjunct Professor at Mercy College in the Veterinary Technology Department, and Psychologist at the Green Chimneys Farm, sbrooks@greenchimneys.org
Other Contact: Kelly, Mercy College, 914-674-7560
Summary: This year long certificate program has been in existence as a single course since 1991, and has existed as a certificate program since 1996 encompassing 6 classes and a 150 hour internship. The certificate combines both hands-on training in animal behavior as well as training in learning to build a relationship to work within the human - animal bond. Currently the courses in this certificate include: An Overview into AAT, Applied Animal Behavior, Animal Behavior, Learning Disabilities, Working with the Elderly, and Abnormal Psychology. Each course is 8 weeks long, and 5 or 6 hours per course, depending on the course. Class size has ranged from 7-15 students, most who are already licensed in a field and are learning how to bring animals into their practices. The basic format of hands-on learning is integrated throughout all classes with theory, principles, and issues.

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4801
Course Title: Ethics and Animal Science (AN SC 414)
Instructors: Debbie Cherney, 607-255-2882, djc6@cornell.edu; A. van Tienhoven, 607-255-4407, Department of Animal Science, Morrison Hall
Summary: Explores the place of humans in the biological world, origins of ethics and morality, speciesism, the use of animals for research and agricultural purposes, and transgenic animals. Student performance is based on a report of a farm tour, participation in discussion, and a project of the student's choice.

ANTHROPOLOGY

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Course Title: Humans and Animals
Instructor: Nerissa Russell, Dept. of Anthropology, 203 McGraw, 607-255-6790, Email: nrussell29@cornell.edu .
Summary: Human-animal relationships are often seen in utilitarian, especially nutritional terms. This is especially true of the analysis of animal remains from archaeological sites. This course focuses on non-dietary roles of animals in human societies. We will explore a broad range of issues. Domestication involves not only the technical process of controlling animal movements and breeding, but requires a fundamental shift in the human perception of animals and their relationship to them. Are pets domestic animals in the same sense as animals that are eaten, or does their owners' relationship with them more closely resemble that of hunters with their prey? Do wild animals mean the same thing to hunter-gatherers and farmers who hunt? We will also consider the importance of animals as wealth, as objects of sacrifice, as totems (metaphors for humans), and as symbols in art. Meat has undeniable dietary value, but the social aspect of consumption is also important. Meat can be used in the context of such behaviors as feasting and meat sharing to create, cement, and manipulate social relationships. We will examine these issues primarily (but not exclusively) in the context of the ethnography and archaeology of the Old World with which the instructor is most familiar. Spring 2007. Offered every 2-3 years.

BIOLOGY

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4801
Course Title: Physiology of Welfare (BioSci 711)
Instructors: Katherine Houpt, 607-253-3450, kah3@cornell.edu
Summary: A seminar course for 1 credit in which the latest literature on animal welfare is read and discussed. The course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates who have had a course in physiology or endocrinology. Each student is responsible for leading the discussion on one or two weeks of the semester. Taught periodically.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4801
Course Title: Religion, Ethics, and the Environment (NTRES 407)
Summary: Examines how religion, philosophy, and ethics influence our treatment of nature. Terms like religion, nature, fact, value, knowledge, and public interest are examined in detail. Particular themes include character and moral development, similarities and differences between moral and scientific claims, truth telling, public reason, and property. Also, animals rights versus ecosystem concerns, responsibility to future generations, the limitations of rationalism in ethics, and discussion of whether women approach moral issues differently from men.

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4801
Course Title: Seminar in Environmental Ethics (NTRES 411)
Summary: Moral concerns relative to the natural environment and agriculture. In successive years, the seminar will focus on such topics as:
1. Animal rights vs. ecosystem concerns.
2. Natural resource management and the concept of the public interest.
3. Environmental ethics in a democratic and pluralistic society.
4. Land use ethics.

 

HISTORY AND HUMANITIES

Institution: Columbia University in the City of New York, Mail Code 2527, 1180 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027
Course Title: Animals from Aristotle to Agamben
Instructor: Samuel Moyn, Associate Professor of History, sam2008@columbia.edu
Summary: This class is a reading survey about how the Western philosophical and theological tradition has conceptualized the difference between humans and (other) animals. Are humans animals? (What are animals, first of all?) If humans are animals, how to conceptualize their differences? Either way, what are the consequences for how to understand oneself and treat animals? What is the nature of human dignity, and does it depend on some plausible distinction of humans from animals? The course culminates in six prominent contemporary philosophers who have turned the traditions they have inherited towards the problem of animals. (Note: this is not a class about animal rights except indirectly, insofar as the question of whether rights might or might not accrue to animals will depend on a prior study of the status of the human-animal border.) View Samuel Moyn's syllabus at http://www.columbia.edu/~sam2008/Animals.html

 

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: Hudson Valley Community College (State University of New York)
Course Title: Animal Law I (CRJS 230)
Instructor: Valerie A. Lang, J.D., M.L.S., langval@hvcc.edu, 518-629-7319
Summary: This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of Animal Law and the Criminal Justice system. Specific topics include the history of animal law, state anti-cruelty laws, the nature of animal cruelty, the link between animal cruelty and violence against humans, the media's influence, investigative techniques, animal fighting, hoarding, control of wildlife, the Animal Welfare Act, the animal rights debate, and overpopulation. Visit to a local animal shelter is included. Textbook: Animals: Welfare, Interests and Rights by David Favre.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Institution: New York University, New York, NY
Course Title: Performing Beyond the Human: Animals, Ecology, Theatre
Instructor: Una Chaudhuri
Summary: This course will explore intersections between theatre practice, performance theory and the emerging fields of animal studies and ecocriticism. How has performance, and specifically theater, reflected, affirmed, contested or flagrantly ignored the growing cultural awareness of threats to the environment? What models has it proposed for encountering, understanding and responding to these threats? Although the course will focus on dramatic literature and performance from the modern period, the age of ecology, we will compare modern and post modern "animal plays" and "eco-plays" with classical plays on similar themes. Among the themes and topics to be explored in relation to modern and contemporary theatre practice are: eco-catastrophe, eco-apocalypse, animality and the construction of the human, zoo culture and post humanism. A fundamental inquiry of the course will concern the intersection of ecocritique and theatrical semiosis: Can performance, by virtue of its unique ontology and phenomenology, offer new and unique approaches to the ecological crisis before us?

Institution: New York University, New York, NY
Course Title: Animal Rites
Instructor: Una Chaudhuri
Summary: This course will explore the relationship between performance and the fast-growing new field of Animal Studies, which examines the cultural meaning of human animal practices. These include not only literary representations of animals (from Aesop's Fables to Will Self's Great Apes), not only dramatic representations of animals (from Aristophanes' The Frogs to Shaeffer's Equus to Albee's The Goat), not only animal performances in circuses and on stage, but also such ubiquitous or isolated social practices as pet-keeping, cock-fighting, dog shows, equestrian displays, rodeos, bull-fighting, animal sacrifice, hunting, animal slaughter, and meat-eating. We will study plays and films that explore the ways our interaction with animals shapes our accounts of the human, the "other" (including the racial and ethnic other), and the world. Plays: Rhinoceros (Ionesco), Equus (Shaeffer), The Goat, The Zoo Story (Albee), The Swan (Egloff), The Hairy Ape (O'Neill), Sylvia (Gurney) Far Away (Churchill), Cries from the Mammal House (Johnson) The Gnadiges Fraulien (Tennessee Williams). Films: The Silence of the Lambs, Amores Perroes, Carnage, Twelve Monkeys, Planet of the Apes, Tarzan, Disney.

Institution: Pace University, Pleasantville, NY
Course Title: Animals & Society
Instructors: Prof. Tracy Basile, 914-762-8898, tbasile@pace.edu
Summary: “Animals & Society” stretches our everyday concepts of civic engagement, community service, and citizenship to include the nonhuman natural world. Students are urged to step outside of mainstream Western cultural and to envision animals from an Indigenous perspective. Native Americans have much to teach us about the importance of animals and that will be a theme that we will return to as we examine our culture’s deeply engrained beliefs about animals in medical research, animals raised for food, and captive and free-living wildlife. Everyone is required to volunteer at one of three sites: a sustainable farm, a wildlife rehabilitation center, and the local SPCS shelter. Emphasis is on integrating in-class discussions, lectures, and films with students’ real-life experiences in the nonprofit world of animal welfare and advocacy. In addition, each student will be involved in planning and running on-campus events related to animal welfare. Whenever possible, we will observe animals directly, through fieldtrips, the on-campus farm, and volunteer opportunities. Taught in the Fall.

NUTRITION AND NATURAL SCIENCE

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4801
Course Title: Vegetarian Nutrition (NS 300)
Instructor: T. Colin Campbell, Division of Nutritional Sciences, tcc1@cornell.edu
Summary: Provides a general overview of various issues surrounding the practice of vegetarian nutrition. Presents some of the empirical evidence supporting the consumption of plant based diets, and introduces new thinking into the discipline of nutritional science. Questions existing principles and assumptions of nutrition knowledge and challenges some of the more fundamental assumptions of the "rules" of scientific investigation. Particular attention is given to the relationships of vegetarianism to the etiology of chronic degenerative diseases.

PSYCHOLOGY

Institution: Niagara County Community College, Sanborn, NY 14132
Course Title: Psychology of Human-Animal Relations (PSY 280)
Instructor: Kathleen C. Gerbasi, Ph.D., 716-754-2466, kcgerbasiphd@earthlink.net
Summary: Human-Animal Relations will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Anthrozoology. Anthrozoology is the study of the many different ways in which human and non-human animals relate to each other and impact each other's lives. Since this is a psychology course, the main focus of the course will be Anthrozoology from the psychological perspective, however we will also touch on other academic fields in addition to psychology. Topics covered in this course represent an overview of current issues in Human-Animal Studies. This includes human's relationships with pets, psychological and physiological benefits of companion animals, concern for animal rights and animal welfare, the link between cruelty to animals and violence toward humans, individual differences in people's relationships with animals (including sex differences), a study of the similarities and differences between human and non-human animals, especially as related to language, communication, cognition and problem solving, and a review of moral and ethical concerns about eating meat, wearing fur and the use of animals for research and entertainment.

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211
Course Title: Animals and Society
Instructor: Janet Alger, Department of Sociology, 518-783-2345, alger@siena.edu
Summary: Documents the condition of oppression that marks the lives of most nonhuman animals and the suffering they experience as a result. Demonstrates the institutionalized nature of this oppression and identifies the major institutions involved. Focuses on alternative ways of accomplishing human goals that are less oppressive for animals.

Institution: Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211
Course Title: Factory Farms, Health and the Environment (SOCI 490)
Instructor: Janet Alger, Department of Sociology, 518-783-2345, alger@siena.edu
Summary: Contact instructor for further information.

VETERINARY MEDICINE AND MEDICINE

Institution: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4801
Course Title: Biomedical Ethics and Clinical Genetics (VTMED 527)
Instructor: John Edward Saidla, Veterinary Medicine, Pop. Medicine & Diagnostic Science, 607-253-3201, jes9@cornell.edu
Summary: This course enters into a study of ethical issues related to animal use, animal welfare, animal genetics, clinical application of genetics, genetics counseling, and clinical day-to-day ethics.


North Carolina

BIOLOGY

Institution: University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Course Title: Animals in Society (HON 120; BIO 485)
Instructor: G. Robert Weedon, DVM, MPH, Honors and Biology, 910.297.2771, weedonr@uncw.edu
Summary: Animals in Society explores the impact of the human-animal relationship. We begin by looking at the history and domestication of animals, the role of pets in society, the significance of the human-animal bond and its importance in animal behavior and euthanasia. We will discuss how animals entertain and serve us, their role in medicine, both in research and pet-facilitated therapy, as well as such controversial topics as the economics of farming and animal rights. Other areas of interest will include animal shelters, public health and zoonotic diseases and veterinary medicine. Students are involved in several field experiences to augment the appropriate topics of class discussion. The semester culminates with a Saturday daytrip to the North Carolina Zoological Park in Asheboro, including a behind the scenes tour of the medical facilities.

Institution: Warren Wilson College, Asheville, NC 28815
Course Title: Animals and Society
Instructor: Bob Eckstein, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 9000,
704-298-3325, ext. 452, reckstein@warren-wilson.edu
Summary: Explores a variety of issues regarding the relationship between human and non-human animals. Topics include animals in research and education; philosophies of animal rights and animal use; animals in entertainment, agriculture and wildlife issues; pet ownership; and cross-cultural comparisons. Discussions revolve around ideas introduced through readings, videos, and presentations by guest speakers.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Institution: North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27526
Course Title: Contemporary Science, Technology and Values (MDS 302)
Instructor: Nell Kriesberg, nellkmutz@earthlink.net
Summary: This is an introductory course in the Science and Technology Studies minor in the Division of Multidisciplinary Studies. Our goal is to gain insights about the interactions between science, society values and animals using a multidisciplinary approach. We will examine major questions/themes throughout the semester, for example:
1. "Is science inherently ethical?"
2. "How do we go about making moral decisions?"
3. "What is the proper place for animals in our increasingly science and technology driven society?"
4. We will examine different sorts of relationships we can have with animals.
Course offering information: This course will be given as a Distance Education course summer 2005 and thus will be open to anyone, as long as they register for it via Continuing Education as a Post Baccalaureat Student (PBS). It is also available during the fall and spring semesters.
Syllabus:
Please see http://home.earthlink.net/~nellkmutz/ for a course syllabus and links to other courses.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Course Title: Ethics and Animals (PHIL 4270)
Instructor: Richard McCarty, Department of Philosophy, 252-328-1018, mccartyr@mail.ecu.edu
Summary: The primary goal of the course is to learn more about ethics or morality from considering the significance of animals in moral deliberation. So in thinking about whether animals have rights, for example, we shall also need to ask wider questions such as, what are rights? and how do they fit into the system of morality? Questions such as these lead us to investigate theoretical approaches to the study of morality in general.
Status: Taught every other year at most.


Ohio

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210
Course Title: Issues Concerning the Use of Animals by Humans (AS 597)
Instructors: David L. Zartman, Department of Animal Sciences, 223 Plumb Hall, 614-292-1387, zartman.3@osu.edu
Summary: Topics pertinent to contemporary animal rights and animal welfare issues are addressed using lectures, debates, videotapes, guest speakers, and student presentations. Students prepare formal "position papers" on a variety of topics throughout the quarter. Critical thinking, consideration of opposing viewpoints, and evaluation of information sources are stressed. Class discussions, and interaction with speakers representing diverse philosophies and interests, are prominent features of the course. The course, which has been taught since 1990, fulfills a University General Education Curriculum requirement in the "Contemporary World Issues" category. Enrollment is limited to seniors.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: John Carroll University, 20700 North Park Boulevard, University Heights, OH
44118-4581
Course Title: The Ethical Treatment of Animals
Instructor: Kathleen S. Kobyljanec, Associate Librarian, Philosophy Department, 216-397-1646, kkobyljanec@jcu.edu
Summary: The course explores topics such as humans' duties and moral responsibilities toward animals, the basic theories of animal ethics espoused by leading animal rights authors (Singer, Regan, Francione, and others,) the rights afforded to animals under U.S. and international law, and animal awareness. Discussion includes legal issues that flow from research using animals, hunting, entertainment, transportation, and factory farms. It was first taught in Spring 2006 with 18 enrolled.

Institution: Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701
Course Title: Speciesism and Animal Rights
Instructor: Albert Mosley, Philosophy Department, 220 Ellis Hall, 740-593-4640, mosley@ohio.edu
Summary: Speciesism is the view that human beings have an inherent right to dominate nonhuman species and use them for human ends. The course examines critics as well as proponents of the morality of speciesism. This involves synthesizing disparate areas in philosophy (ethics, philosophical psychology, philosophy of science) and applying them to the use of nonhumans in areas such as agriculture, biology, psychology, and medicine.

Institution: Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435
Course Title: pending
Instructor:
Summary:

PSYCHOLOGY

Institution: Hiram College, Hiram OH 44234
Course Title: Ethics in Research on Animal Behavior
Instructor: Kimberley A. Phillips, Departments of Psychology and Biology, 330-569-5229, phillipsk@hiram.edu
Summary: An intensive exploration into the ethical issues involved in animal behavior research. The course begins with a discussion of philosophical positions on the moral standing of animals. Other topics of discussion include animals in behavioral research, ethology and animal minds, psychological well-being, how to determine pain and suffering, and regulatory issues in present day research.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Institution: Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH 45236

Course Title: Theology and Animals

Instructor: Elizabeth Farians, Theology Department, ejf.ape@juno.com , 513-884-8062

Summary: This course will center on Christianity, violence, and animals. It will explore the relationship between people and animals with violence as the focus. The course will examine the moral and ethical implications of the way animals are treated in our society, including the commercial, agricultural, pharmacological and entertainment industries. How this treatment is accepted, promoted and/or justified by both secular and religious society will be studied. Whether this treatment redounds to us in spiritual, psychological, and physical ways will be examined. The food we eat will be critical to this analysis because killing and eating animals is often our most intimate involvement with them.  We will also consider whether the patriarchal character of religion and society influences the treatment of animals and why especially women and children may be adversely affected. The possible connections between the violence we inflict on animals and a resulting violent behavior of humans will be explored. All of this will be in the context of the Judeo-Christian scriptures and tradition.
To offset the violence a program of humane education will be considered. Related scientific findings from disciplines such as psychology and sociology will be investigated. Insights for professions such as education, social work, ministry, criminal justice, nursing, science and law will be highlighted. The material alsi is aligned with peace studies and women's studies and it also will be useful for parenting and peaceful living. A religious basis for an alternate and compassionate lifestyle and a dominion of care, rather than domination, for all creation will be presented.

Course offering information: The course was originally taught in a summer workshop format entitled "Christianity, Violence and Animals." The new semester-long course "Theology and Animals" will be offered during the Spring 2006 semester.

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701
Course Title: Animals and Human Society (Sociology 204)
Instructor: Aileen Hall, hall@ohio.edu, 740-597-1444
Summary: Much of human society is structured through interactions with non-human animals or through interactions with other humans regarding animals, yet sociology has largely ignored these types of interactions. This course is designed to bring into the realm of sociological study the relationships that exist between humans and non-human animals. A major focus will be on the social construction of animals in American culture. Students will learn how the meanings attached to various animals determine the nature of the human/animal and human/human interactions that occur, including how they are used to perpetuate hierarchical human/human relationships such as racism, sexism, and class privilege. This course will not be about animals, per se, but about the differences that animals have made in human societies and the difference humans have made on the lives of animals.
Course offering information: This course has been taught annually since 1999, usually in the spring semester.


Oregon

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331
Course Title: Contentious Issues in Animal Agriculture (ANS 315)
Instructor: Steve Davis, 541-737-1892, steven.l.davis@orst.edu
Summary: This course, available to all undergraduate students, features a number of guest lecturers, and devotes several class sessions to each of the following five issue areas:
1. Public lands and livestock grazing
2. Animal products and human nutrition
3. Animal products and food safety issues
4. Animal rights/animal welfare
5. Animal biotechnologies

Institution: Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331
Course Title: Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture (ANS 420)
Instructor: Steve Davis, 541-737-1892, steven.l.davis@orst.edu
Summary: This is a senior level intensive writing course and is therefore required of all animal science majors. The course combines the study of ethics and issues in animal agriculture such as animal welfare, animal rights and animal liberation. The students use different writing activities to explore and discuss these issues.

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: Lewis & Clark College, Northwestern School of Law, 615 S.W. Palatine Hill Road
Portland, OR 97219
Course Title: Animal Law Clinical Internship Seminar (CIS)
Instructors: Laura Ireland Moore, Executive Director of the National Center for Animal Law, 503-768-6849, lireland@lclark.edu
Summary: The Animal Law CIS helps law students learn the tools of the trade, exposing them to different work place environments, and to people working in the field both in nonprofit and law firm settings. The course is certainly educational for students, but also provides attorneys and organizations with much needed legal assistance. The Animal Law CIS is the only animal law course in the nation that allows students to earn credit for interning with animal law attorneys and organizations, and the only one that teaches practical skills, rather than simply the history and theory, of animal law.

Institution: Lewis & Clark College, Northwestern School of Law, 615 SW Palatine Hill Road, Portland, OR 97219
Course Title: Animal Law Overview Course
Instructor: Pamela Frasch , Animal Legal Defense Fund, 919 SW Taylor St., Fourth Floor, Portland, OR 97202, 503-231-1602, pfrasch@aldf.org, and Georgie Duckler, Animal Law Practice
Summary: A 15-week course covering a broad array of animal legal issues; readings draw from many relevant examples of case law.

Institution: Lewis & Clark College, Northwestern School of Law, 615 SW Palatine Hill Road, Portland, OR 97219
Course Title: Animal Law Seminar
Instructor: Pamela Frasch, Animal Legal Defense Fund, 919 SW Taylor St., Fourth Floor, Portland, OR 97202, 503-231-1602, pfrasch@aldf.org, and Georgie Duckler, Animal Law Practice
Summary: This couse is offered every other spring (the next course will be spring 2006). This class is limited to twelve students and is more focused on cutting-edge areas in the field of animal law. This course began in spring of 2002 and has 4-6 students each spring.

VETERINARY MEDICINE AND MEDICINE

Institution: Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331
Course Title: Veterinary Medical Ethics
Instructors: Jill Parker, Large Animal Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine 541-737-6949; Courtney Campbell, Department of Philosophy, Director of the Program for Ethics, Science, and the Environment, 541-737-6196
Summary: This is an intensive elective course that offers an introduction to ethics in veterinary medicine, with specific attention to the moral status of animals, the process of ethical reasoning, and ethical decision making in practice.


Pennsylvania

ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY

Institution: Animal Behavior Institute, Inc. Furlong, PA 18925
Course Title: Animal Assisted Therapy (ABI 211)
Instructor: Janis G. Hammer, VMD, hammerj@animaledu.com , 866-755-0448
Summary: This is an online course. There is a rapidly growing movement to incorporate animals as part of the therapeutic setting. Students learn about the difference between animal assisted activities, therapy and education (AAA/T/E), working animals and assistance animals. The course covers working with animals and children, adults, the elderly, and the disabled in various settings including hospitals, nursing homes, schools and prisons. We will also review what is required to start and run a safe and effective program.

Institution: Animal Behavior Institute, Inc. Furlong, PA 18925
Course Title: The Human-Animal Bond (ABI 232)
Instructor: Janis G. Hammer, VMD, hammerj@animaledu.com , 866-755-0448
Summary: This course explores the history and psychology of human relationships with animals and nature and will be run completely online. The student will learn about the relationship between people and animals by discussing domestication, socialization, religion, culture, farming, research, and pets. Other topics include pet overpopulation, relinquishment, bonding, and health benefits from the bond (for people and animals). The principal objective is to gain an understanding of the various roles animals play in our lives.
Course offering information: This course will be taught for the first time beginning in January 2006.

Institution: Delaware Valley College, Doylestown, PA 18901-2697
Course Title: People and Animals
Instructor: Janis G. Hammer, VMD, hammerj@devalcol.edu
Summary: The course covers many topics regarding the positive aspects of our relationship with animals as well as the much less common but negative aspects. The topics discussed include but are not limited to; animals in religion, domestication, service and working animals, the changing role of animals in society over time (e.g. ownership vs. guardian, pet insurance), the role of animals in different cultures, animal abuse, inappropriate bonding, and the health benefits of the bond for both man and animals. This course is a prerequisite for the spring course; Animal Assisted Activities and Therapy; Programs, Procedures, and Responsibilities.

Institution: Harcum College, 750 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
Course Title: Introduction to Animal-Assisted Therapy and Animal-Assisted Activities--Distance Learning Certificate course
Coordinator: To register, contact Kelly Wilson, Continuing Studies, (610) 526-6083, kwilson@harcum.edu
Instructor: Phil Arkow, (856) 627-5118, arkowpets@snip.net
. NOTE: Class is limited to 12 students.
Summary: This comprehensive Introduction to Animal-Assisted Therapy & Activities is offered entirely online by internationally renowned human-animal bond and AAT author Phil Arkow. The course offers a Certificate of Completion: this Certificate may be eligible for employer reimbursement and Continuing Education Units depending upon the requirements of the student's employer and/or professional association. This course covers the human-animal bond and its therapeutic applications. It is designed both for professionals from a wide range of disciplines, and for volunteers, students and newcomers who wish to further their knowledge and explore career opportunities in this emerging, multi-disciplinary field. International students are particularly welcomed. Students will examine how contact with animals can enhance human well-being when incorporated into health care, social services, psychology, psychiatry, education, allied health, therapy, and many more fields. Students may already be trained in these or similar fields, or may be seeking to enter the field. The course explores conceptual frameworks, research, and practical techniques that will empower you to introduce animals in a variety of milieus. It enhances students' personal growth and professional development. Through extensive reading, on-line research, site visits to local facilities, and networking in on-line discussion groups, students will obtain both an overview of the human-companion animal bond (HCAB) and Animal-Assisted Therapy & Activities (AAT/AAA), and opportunities to concentrate on specific programs or applications of particular personal and/or professional interest.

Institution: West Chester University, West Chester, PA
Course Title: Special Topics: Animals in Health and Human Service (HEA435/581)
Instructor: Lynn Carson, Ph.D., CHES
Summary: To validate the significant purpose that animals serve in people's health and well being, this course will provide students with a thorough understanding of the role of service and therapy animals in improving the quality of life for disabled individuals and others in need. Course content is specifically designed for health and human service professionals who are considering introducing animal service and animal therapy into their work environments. Students will be introduced to the various types of service animals and a major emphasis will be placed on the types of services these animals perform for physically disabled, hearing impaired, and sight impaired individuals. An overview of the role of service/therapy animals and practice settings (homes, employment sites, nursing homes, hospitals, schools, and prisons) will be presented to demonstrate the wide diversity of service opportunities for animals. The use of animals as therapeutic agents will be highlighted with a focus on the roles of dogs and horses in practice settings (i.e. physical therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and psychotherapy). Other service roles (search and rescue and criminal justice) will be included. Guest speakers, visits to training facilities and discussions with trainers, owners, volunteers will help studnets understand how service/therapy animals are versatile reliable assistants serving an important role in supportive and therapeutic care.

ANIMAL WELFARE

Institution: Animal Behavior Institute, Inc. Furlong, PA 18925
Course Title: Animal Enrichment (ABI 222)
Instructor: Dr. Fortier, fortierg@animaledu.com
Summary: Behavioral and environmental enrichment is explored in a comprehensive approach. This includes an overview of animals' psychological needs, a systematic approach for coupling enrichment solutions to animal problems, practical suggestions on design and application, and a discussion of assessment and long-term application. Major components of enrichment are reviewed with respect to the Animal Welfare Act and the principles of animal management.

HISTORY AND HUMANITIES

Institution: Delaware Valley College, Doylestown, PA 18901-2697
Course Title: People and Animals
Instructor: Richard McCarty, 252-328-1018, mccarty@mail.ecu.edu
Summary: The primary goal of the course is to learn more about ethics or morality from considering the significance of animals in moral deliberation. So in thinking about whether animals have rights, for example, we shall also need to ask wider questions such as, what are rights and how do they fit into the system of morality? Questions such as these lead us to investigate theoretical approaches to the study of morality in general.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Penn State University (Fayette Campus), Uniontown, PA 15401
Course Title: Ethics and Social Issues (Phil 103)
Instructor: Evelyn B. Pluhar, Ph.D., 724-430-4258, exp5@psu.edu
Summary: This course examines a number of ethical issues, including the ways in which humans use animals for their own benefit or convenience. Arguments for and against such use are explored to help determine whether or not they are justified. Independent thinking and discussion are strongly encouraged, and students are evaluated on how well they can back up their views with clear, careful reasoning.

VETERINARY MEDICINE AND MEDICINE

Institution: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010
Course Title: Veterinary Ethical Issues (#9009)
Instructor: James Serpell, Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, 215-898-1004, serpell@vet.upenn.edu
Summary: A core course for first year vet students that addresses/introduces the peculiar ethical dilemmas encountered by practicing veterinarians. Combines both didactic and case-based teaching methods; the latter focusing primarily on "real-life" ethical conflicts of interest between veterinarians, their clients, and their patients.

Institution: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010
Course Title: Animals, Veterinarians and Society (#9823)
Instructor: James Serpell, Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, 215-898-1004, serpell@vet.upenn.edu
Summary: This third-year elective course aims to introduce veterinarians to the current debate on animal use and includes the following topics: history of ethical concerns about animal use; development of contemporary attitudes to animals; animal consciousness and sentience; animal rights; animal welfare science; animals and the law; welfare problems in companion animals; and various recent areas of discussion and debate ( e.g., cloning/bioengineering).


South Carolina

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: University of South Carolina, Spartanburg, SC 29303
Course Title: Animals and Society (SOC 321)
Instructor: Dr. Clif Flynn, Department of Sociology, 864-503-5635, cflynn@gw.uscs.edu
Summary: This course will examine the role of animals in human society. It will examine how animals are socially constructed, it will challenge traditional representations of nonhuman animals, and study animals as minded social actors. It will apply sociological approaches to the study of human-animal relationships, and even animal-animal relationships. Finally, it will explore the oppression of nonhuman animals, and consider the moral status and rights of animals in human society.


Tennessee

ANIMAL WELFARE

Institution: University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996
Course Title: Animals and Human Welfare: Medical, Moral, and Social Connections
Instructors: Catherine Faver, John New, and John Nolt
Summary: This course offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the effects of animals on human health and well-being. Beginning with an overview of scholarly and cultural perspectives on the relationship between humans and animals, the course examines the benefits and risks of humans' relationships with companion animals; the relationship between animal abuse and interpersonal violence; and the costs and consequences of using animals as resources. In exploring the interdependence of humans and animals, we will consider the argument that fostering human welfare requires compassion and justice for animals as well as for humans.

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: University of Tennessee, College of Law1505 W. Cumberland Ave. Knoxville, TN 37996
Course Title: Animals and the Law
Instructor: Joan M. Heminway, heminway@libra.law.utk.edu , 865-974-3813 at University of Tennessee or heminway@bc.edu , 617-552-1238 at Boston College (Fall 2005)
Summary: The course is an interdisciplinary seminar covering various intersections among nonhuman animals, humans, and law (statutory, decisional, and natural). The culmination of the semester for each student involves the presentation of a progress report on a public service project that the student has been working on during the semester.
Course offering information: This course was taught during Spring 2005.

NUTRITION AND NATURAL SCIENCE

Institution: University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0230
Course Title: Issues in Vegetarianism
Instructors: Michael and Paula Zemel, Department of Nutrition, mzemel@utk.edu, pzemel@utk.edu
Summary: Examines ethical and health issues related to vegetarian diets. Students will evaluate mainly electronically-based materials on vegetarian issues, assess arguments that are "pro" and "con" and create a technology-based resource to communicate these issues.


Texas

ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY

Institution: University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203
Course Title: Animal Assisted Therapy (COUN 5530)
Instructor: Cynthia Chandler, Ed.D., LPC, LMFT, BCIA-C & EEG, Professor of Counseling, chandler@coe.unt.edu , 940-565-2910
Summary: This course is graduate level, but undergraduates may also take it as a special problems course. The course covers research and methods for the application of animal assisted therapy in the field of mental health counseling and closely related fields. The course emphasizes how a professional counselor may utilize the special relationship she/he has with his/her pet to provide services for persons in need. The safety and welfare of the therapy pet are also emphasized.
Website: http://www.coe.unt.edu/CDHE/AAT/

ANIMAL STUDIES

Institution: Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas
Course Title: Animals and Society (AGR236)
Instructor: Barry L. Williams, Ph.D., Department of Agricultural Sciences, agr_blw@shsu.edu , phone: 936-294-1224
Summary:
This core course, available to all majors, is a discussion oriented course that will acquaint the student with the broad role of animals in society from a national, global, and histories perspective. The impact of animals and domestic livestock on economic, social, and political policy will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on non-agricultural and agriculture uses, societal and cultural perspectives, consumer influences, animal ethics, animal research, appropriate animal care, livestock quality assurance programs, animal welfare, animal rights and the animal-human bond.
Course offering information: The course is currently being offered three times a year, during the fall, spring, and summer sessions.

Institution: Texas A&M University, Commerce, TX 75429
Course Title: Animals and Society (AnS416)

Instructor: C. Pat Bagley, Professor and Department Head, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Pat_bagley@tamu-commerce.edu , 903-886-5351
Summary: This captone course, available for all juniors and seniors, is designed to provide a thorough understanding of how animals impact our daily lives, our society, and our economic structure. While the majority of the course is spent on the major companion animals (dogs, horses, and cats) time is also spent on other novel species as well. Objectives include: 1. Economic impact of animals on society. 2. Profile of a "typical" household that has pets. 3. Prominent roles of animals in history. 4. The uses of horses in other societies. 5. Impact of animals on the well-being of humans. Course projects include volunteering at local humane shelter, therapeutic riding center,or elderly patient care center. The course is also occasionally offered as a summer short-term travel course in Mexico, where students observe animal therapy at a local orphanage.
Course offering information: The course will be offered Fall 2005. It has been offered Spring 2000, Fall 2001, Spring and Fall 2002, Spring and Fall 2003, Summer and Fall 2004, and Summer 2005.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Institution: Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798
Course Title: Field Studies in Captive Animal Enrichment (ENV 4613)
Instructor: Heidi Marcum, heidi_marcum@baylor.edu
Summary: This class is designed to provide hands-on training in the enrichment of captive animals through individual and group work, often without direct supervision. Class objectives include: experience in enriching captive animals; hands-on, practical experience with a current environmental problem; experience with designing enrichment activities, taking data and writing up results; experience presenting results using PowerPoint.


Vermont

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: The University of Vermont
Course Title: ASCI 122: Animal Welfare/Animals in Society (3 credits, spring)
Instructor: Assistant Professor Russ Hovey, 200E Terrill Hall, 570 Main St, Burlington, VT 05405. rhovey@uvm.edu
Summary: This introductory course is a required class for all Animal Science majors at UVM, and was one of the first offered in the United States. During the semester, students are exposed to a variety of topics that encompass the use and care of animals by mankind. We first examine the ethical issues of animal use, different cultural standpoints and issues such as cruelty and hoarding. Students then examine the biological basis of animal welfare - including aspects such as stress, behavior and pain. Additional topics covered focus on relevant legislation and animal activist groups. Toward the end of the semester the class focuses on current topics in animal welfare, including specific coverage of issues relevant to 1) biomedical research, 2) companion animals, 3) livestock, and 4) zoos/exotics. Throughout the semester students hear from invited guests including scientists, veterinarians and animal activists. Part of the course assessment is a semester-long project where students work as teams to consult for a hypothetical client in a real-life scenario for a variety of animal species. Students also have the opportunity to train and participate as a team-member in an intercollegiate animal welfare judging competition.
Course offering information: The course will be taught next in Spring 2006.

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: Vermont Law School, Chelsea Street, P.O. Box 96 South Royalton, VT 05068-0096
Course Title: Animal Rights Law
Instructor: Steven M. Wise, 896 Beacon Street, Suite 303, Boston, MA 02215, 781-453-0802, wiseboston@aol.com
Summary: Examines fundamental moral and legal rights and whether nonhuman animals should have them; the nature and adequacy of current legal protections for animals; the relationship between animal rights and environmental rights.


Virginia

BIOLOGY

Institution: James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807
Course Title: Animal Welfare (BIO 312)
Instructor: Ruth E. Chodrow, Biology Department, 540-886-9371, rchodrow@verizon.net Summary: Examines the biological basis of animal welfare. Topics include the evolution of domestic animals, physiological and behavioral measurements of stress, welfare assessment, and pain perception. Case studies examine the use of animals for companionship, food, medical research, and entertainment. Limited enrollment to 24 students. Spring class.

 

MARINE MAMMAL BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

Institution: George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030
Course Title Marine Mammal Biology & Conservation (EVPP 490-004/505-010/ BIOL 507-001)
Instructor: Chris Parsons, Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, ecm-parsons@earthlink.net
Summary: This lecture course (3.0 credit hours) covers the biology, ecology and behavior of marine mammals from polar bears and sea otters to whales and dolphins. Marine mammal conservation is a major component of the course. There are several lecture sessions devoted to the issue of whaling, threats to marine mammal populations, and current conservation topics such as marine mammals and noise pollution. The course includes a field trip to the Smithsonian Natural History Museum and a number of guest lectures from a variety of marine mammal international experts.

Institution: George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030
Course Title: Endangered Mammals
Instructor: Chris Parsons, Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, ecm-parsons@earthlink.net
Summary: Students cover a variety of endangered mammal species from whales to black-footed ferrets, and issues such as the bushmeat trade, hunting and the problem of exotic pets. Guest speakers discuss international laws and treaties governing endangered mammals and how conservation and welfare ccan be improved. A final assignment for students is an evaluation of both US and domestic laws with respect to endangered and vulnerable mammals.

 

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030
Course Title Gender, Race and the Natural World (SOC 590/EVPP 636) graduate course
Instructor: Department of Sociology and Anthropology, 703-993-1443
Summary: Engages students in an interdisciplinary critical analysis of the ideologies that underpin the interlocking cultural narratives of speciesism, racism, and sexism. We address the role of science in the production of the ideology of domination and dualism, the cultural representations of nonhuman and human animals, and theoretical critiques of the oppression of the other.

 

Michigan State University

SOCIOLOGY

Institution: Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Course Title: Animals and Cultural Transformations (SOC 862)
Instructor: Prof. Linda Kalof, Department of Sociology, lkalof@msu.edu
Summary: This course is an historical overview of the relationship between humans and animals and how those relationships have changed with changing social conditions. Designed to enhance the Sociology Department's theme in Global Transformations and Food, Agriculture and the Environment, the course is the first formal, regularly scheduled graduate course in animal studies and is open to graduate students in the College of Social Sciences. Offered in the Spring of every year.

 

Institution: Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450
Course Title: The Earth-Universe Relationship: Widening the Circle
Instructor: J. William Holliday, Ph.D., 703-993-1443, JW Holliday600@aol.com
Summary: This Earth-universe relationship course is subtitled: "Widening the Circle of Compassion." The latter phrase is Einstein's. It has to do with his sense that the more humans focus on all of creation's common cosmological origin and appreciate the fact of space-time-matter's emergence out of what for Einstein (and Berry, Swimme) was a numinous mystery�the larger our sense of Being will become. It is a personal sense of being as well, one large enough to encompass and include all other beings with love and reverence. It is a sense that allows us to become, as Thomas Berry (The Great Work) says, "a community of subjects" rather than of objects. Thus we widen the circle of compassion to include oceans and rain forests, starving infants and endangered species, and the individual suffering of factory farm animals abused and tormented by the intensive confinement system of corporate agribusiness. Students will explore the implications of the late 20th century scientific consensus of astrophysics that the universe not only emerged 13.7 billion years ago out of a quantum mystery but also is in fact omni-centered, a circle whose center is everywhere, whose periphery nowhere. This positive, postmodern scientific understanding of the origin and nature of the cosmos means that all matter since the beginning of time is part and parcel of an unbroken, ever-developing creativity that includes not only subatomic particles but stars, planets, and more specifically, Earth, with its untold species of life, the most recent and pertinent of which is homo sapiens.


Washington

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164
Course Title: Rights and Welfare of Animals (ANS 285)
Instructors: Ruth Newberry, Center for the Study of Animal Well-being, Department of Animal Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, 509-335-5059, rnewberry@wsu.edu
Summary: Examines the ethics and philosophies underlying human/animal relations. Defines and assesses animal welfare using knowledge of animal health, productivity, physiology and behavior. Examines the controversies and current issues relating to the use of animals in agriculture, recreation, cultural events and research. Evaluates the impact of current and future legislation on animal use and management practices. See: www.ansci.wsu.edu/courses/as285/courseoutline.htm

HISTORY AND HUMANITIES

Institution: Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9118
Course Title: pending
Instructor:
Summary:

MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Institution: Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA
Course Title: "Are There Dogs in Heaven?"
Instructors: Kathleen Braden, Professor of Geography, kbraden@spu.edu , 206-281-2927
Summary: This seminar introduces the first-year college student to the liberal arts in a Christian University through the investigation of human relations with animals. Topics will include: Christian writing on whether animals have souls, the issue of animal suffering, emotional bonds between people and animals, ethics of laboratory testing and keeping animals in captivity (circuses and zoos), cultural variations in attitudes toward animals, animals who perform work for people, psychological benefits of pets to the elderly, teaching language to animals, American habits and spending on pets, including the advent of pet cemeteries and therapists. Students will explore these topics through their own experience, current news events, examination of scholarly writing in theology, ethics, and social science, art and poems that elicit our emotions about animals.
Course offering information: This course has been offered since Fall 2001 and will be offered next in Fall 2005.

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: Seattle University, Broadway and Madison, Seattle, WA 98122
Course Title: Animal Rights and Environmental Ethics (Phil 309)
Instructor: Daniel Dombrowski, Department of Philosophy, 206-296-5465, ddombrow@seattleu.edu
Summary: This course deals with two main debates: (1) the debate between anthropocentrists (those who favor a human centered view of the world) and non-anthropocentrists; and (2) the debate between moral individualists and ecoholists. Readings include Peter Singer, Holmes Rolston III, Henry David Thoreau, and others. The class also examines the history of attitudes toward animals and the natural environment.

VETERINARY MEDICINE AND MEDICINE

Institution: Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164
Course Title: Professional Orientation and Ethics
Instructor: Francois Martin, fmartin@vetmed.wsu.edu
Summary: This first-year required class examines the connection between veterinary medicine and related fields (pet loss and grief, cycle of violence, ethical decision making, legal issues, animal rights and animal welfare, etc.) This course features several guest speakers.


Wisconsin

PHILOSOPHY

Institution: University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, WI 54481
Course Title: Environmental Ethics
Instructor: Michael P. Nelson, Department of Philosophy and College of Natural Resources, 715-346-3907, m2nelson@uwsp.edu
Summary: This course explores contemporary approaches to environmental ethics, including Judeo-Christian stewardship, animal liberation/rights, biocentrism, and the ecocentric Land Ethic of Aldo Leopold. We also look at such contemporary topics as current land use practices, Gaia theory, environmental economics, Deep Ecology, and radical environmental activism, and we explore larger questions about the nature of nature, human nature, and what an appropriate relationship between human beings and the natural environment might look like.

Institution: University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, WI 54481
Course Title: Advanced Environmental Ethics: The Ethics of Hunting
Instructor: Michael P. Nelson, Department of Philosophy and of Natural Resources, 715-346-3907, m2nelson@uwsp.edu
Summary: This course explores and evaluated the arguments that are typically offered in support of, and in opposition to, hunting.


Canada

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Institution: University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1
Course Title: Principles of Farm Animal Care and Welfare
Instructors: Ian J.H. Duncan, Chair in Animal Welfare, 519-824-4120 ext. 53652, iduncan@uoguelph.ca
Summary: This senior undergraduate course introduces students to the main ethical issues of using animals in contemporary agriculture and elsewhere. The course deals with the following questions:
Do animals have moral standing?
What is animal welfare?
What are the main causes of reduced welfare in farm animals?
How can we assess animal welfare?
How can we improve animal welfare?
Where does Canada stand in the world of animal welfare?
How can we regulate animal welfare?
Will society pay for improved animal welfare?
Syllabus: www.aps.uoguelph.ca/teaching/10-315.html

ANIMAL WELFARE

Institution: University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4
Courses:
1. Animals and Society
2. Animal Welfare and the Ethics of Animal Use
3. Topics in Animal Welfare
4. Tutorial in Animal Welfare Research
5. Individual graduate instruction in animal welfare
Instructors: David Fraser, Dan Weary and Marina von Keyserlingk, Animal Welfare Program, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, and W. Maurice Young Centre for Applied Ethics. fraserd@interchange.ubc.ca , danweary@interchange.ubc.ca
Summary:
1. Animals and Society (AGRO 215)
A second year course (first offered 2005) designed to introduce students to the role of animals in human culture and the use of animals in food production, biomedical research, companionship, and entertainment. The course also introduces students to the animal protection movement and animal law.
2. Animal Welfare and the Ethics of Animal Use (AGRO 315/ANSC 515)
A senior undergraduate/graduate course (first offered 1998) designed to expose students to many of the ethical issues surrounding the use of animals in agriculture, science, and society. The course covers:
Scientific research that attempts to understand and improve animal welfare.
Philosophical positions on animals use.
Relevant developments in society, economics, and the law.
3. Topics in Animal Welfare (ANSC 550)
A graduate seminar course involving reading and discussion of current topics in animal welfare and ethics. Topics are chosen to fit the interests of students, and may include the interplay of science and value issues in assessing animal welfare, research on animal cognition and its implications for animal ethics, effects of trade agreements on the welfare of agricultural animals, use of animal and non-animal models in research, and the relation between animal welfare and environmental concerns.
4. Tutorials in Animal Welfare Research (ANSC 551)
A graduate seminar course based on critical reading of research papers on animal welfare. Topics are chosen to fit the interests of students and may include environmental preference research, studies of motivation strength, the use of pathology and epidemiology in animal welfare assessment, on-farm methods for welfare assessment, and studies of animal "stress".
5. Individual post-graduate instruction in animal welfare and animal ethics
The Animal Welfare Program creates individual graduate programs incorporating a mixture of science and the humanities, on animal welfare and the ethics of animal use. The overall goals of the program are to help students, animal users and society to find practical solutions and build informed consensus about the use of animals for food, research, entertainment and companionship.
Website: For links to all courses: http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/animalwelfare/.

Institution: University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1
Course Title: Animal Welfare: Does it Matter? (UNIV*1200*24)
Instructors: Ian J.H. Duncan, Chair in Animal Welfare, 519-824-4120 ext. 53652, iduncan@uoguelph.ca
Summary: This interdisciplinary course will examine animal welfare from a variety of viewpoints. It will involve considerations of science, the philosophy of science and ethical theory. It will consider questions like: How can animal welfare be defined? Is it possible to study animal welfare scientifically? Can we know what animals feel? Do animals have moral standing? Do we have obligations to animals? Does any of this matter?

LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

Institution: University of Victoria, Faculty of Law, PO Box 2400, STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3H7, Canada
Course Title: Animals, Culture and the Law
Instructor: Maneesha Decka, Assistant Professor of Law, 250-721-8175, mdeckha@uvic.ca
Summary: This seminar will explore the relationship between nonhuman and human animals, focusing on the legal and ethical issues raised by the status of animals as property. Specific topics include the examination of: 1) the current law characterizing animals as property; 2) the various western philosophical positions on animals that have animated the law; 3) the idea of animal rights and other interests and different theories that argue for greater legal protection of animals; 4) the types of legal alternatives proposed to animals' current status as property; and 5) the impact that greater legal protection for animals will have on marginalized human communities and the commitment to cultural pluralism, the politics of animal advocacy movements in this regard, and the possibility of human and animal rights coexisting. The course adopts a novel theoretical framework through which to learn about animals, cuture and justice. And the course uses innovative active learning techniques such as drama, visual arts, reflective writing, small group work, concept mapping, etc. This type of engaged pedagogy stimulates student learning and promotes critical thinking.
Course offering information: This new seminar will be taught in the Spring of 2007.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY

Institution: York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
Course Title: Envisioning Animals: Animals and Visual Culture (GS/ARTH 5140)
Instructor: Matthew Browe, PhD, Sessional Assistant Professor of Visual Arts
Summary: This course deals with the role of visual depictions of animals in aesthetic, activist, environmental and biological contexts. It explores the role of imagery in constituting contempory and historical conceptions of animality. The course objectives are to develop an understanding of the importance of imagery in human-animal relations.
Course offering information: This course is a new graduate seminar being offered for the first time in Fall 2005.

PSYCHOLOGY

Institution: Simon Frasier University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
Course Title: Beyond puppy love: The social relationships between humans and animals
Instructor: Antonia J.Z. Henderson, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, 604-291-3250
Summary: In the process of domestication and our subsequent treatment of domestic animals, have we done them a great service in saving them from the forces of nature? Or have we exploited animals to serve our own selfish needs? In this course we will undertake a critical analysis of humankind's relationship with domestic animals. We will explore the various ways in which humans have used domestic animals and question who benefits in the human/animal domestic equation.

SOCIOLOGY AND RESEARCH ETHICS

Institution: University College of Cape Breton, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
Course Title: Animals & People (AN/S 358)
Instructor: Tracey Smith-Harris, Department of Anthropology & Sociology, 902-563-1328
Summary: A critical and comparative examination of the relationship between people and animals. This course explores human attitudes toward animals by examining such topics as animal representations in art, literature and popular culture, as well as the social and cultural constructions of legal, political, economic and philosophical issues pertaining to animals. Much of the focus is on the controversies surrounding this complex social relationship.

 

Spain

MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

Institution: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Course Title: Rights of Animals and Ethics of Nature
Instructor: Dr. Marta Tafalla, marta.tafalla@uab.es
Summary: Introductory course about the philosophical basis of animal and environment protection. Main theories and actual debate on certain topics such as animal experiments, vegetarianism, and hunting.

 

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